III. Isis et Serapis
Images
Interactive Bots
Maps
Ancient Latin Texts
Modern Latin Textbooks
Links
Sites:
Baths of Trajan House of Paullus Aemilius Lepidus and Cornelia Portico of Livia
Colosseum
 
Vicus Sandaliarius
 
 



Baths of Trajan

Directions: Roma, Reg III (to Vicus Sandaliarius), north (to Clivus Orbius), southeast (to Trajan's Baths); Shortcut @go Trajan's Baths

Resources:

Uses: cultural information on public bathing; relevance to Ecce Romani II-B, ch. 43. Keywords: natatio, frigidarium, tepidarium, caldarium, palaestra, nyphaeum, apodyterium.



House of Paullus Aemilius Lepidus and Cornelia

Directions: Roma, Reg III (to Vicus Sandaliarius), north (to Clivus Orbius), east (to entrance to House of Paullus Aemilius Lepidus); Shortcut @go House of Paullus

Resources:

Uses: This site can be used to introduce students to the nature, design, and appearance of the type of house that would be inhabited by an upper-class Roman. It is suitable for treasure-hunt style assignments (see Course Materials Repository for some examples). The Cornelia bot can be used to illustrate the male ventriloquism behind what might appear to be the "voices" of ancient women; the long poem of which Cornelia is the first-person narrator was written by a male poet



Colosseum

Directions: Roma, Reg III (to Vicus Sandaliarius), south (to Colosseum); Shortcut @go Colosseum:

Resources:

Uses: This site can be used to introduce students to the design and history of the Colosseum, to the nature of the combat sports held there, and to the role these played in Roman society. It is ideal for treasure-hunt style assignments and as an imaginative starting place for research projects on these topics.



Portico of Livia

Directions: Roma, Reg III (to Vicus Sandaliarius); north (to Clivus Orbius); northeast (to Clivus Suburanus); south (to Portico of Livia); Shortcut @go Portico of Livia

Resources:

Uses: The Portico gives an appropriate imaginative setting for Roman art, helping visitors to understand how the Roman populace was able to view art works and the important recreational function of the numerous porticoes in Rome. It can be used for treasure-hunt style assignments on Roman mythology or more analytic assignments where students compare these small-scale representations with the larger statues of deities, or the Roman god/goddess with a Greek counterpart. Students can also be sent to find factual information about Livia, to compare her portraits with those of other Roman women, or to reflect upon what Livia's life and iconography tell us about the status of and expectations for Roman women in the early Empire.



Vicus Sandaliarius

Directions: Reg III (to Vicus Sandaliarius) Shortcut @go Vicus Sandaliarius

Resources: Clickable map of Region III and part of Region IV showing streets and major monuments

Uses: Navigation aid in VRoma